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Mugabe’s successor back from exile

FILE PHOTO: Zimbabwe Vice-President Emmerson Mnangagwa listens as President Robert Mugabe (not pictured) delivers his state of the nation address to the country's parliament in Harare, August 25, 2015. REUTERS/Philimon Bulawayo/File Photo

Zimbabwe’s former vice-president, whose sacking sparked events leading to the shock resignation of long-time leader Robert Mugabe, will be sworn in as the new president on Friday, state TV says.

Emmerson Mnangagwa, who fled to South Africa two weeks ago, had arrived back in the country, it added.

His dismissal led the ruling party and the military to intervene and force an end to Mr Mugabe’s 37-year long rule.

The news sparked wild celebrations across the country late into the night.

The announcement that the 93-year-old president was stepping down came in the form of a letter read out in parliament on Wednesday, abruptly halting impeachment proceedings against him.

In it, Mr Mugabe said he was resigning to allow a smooth and peaceful transfer of power, and that his decision was voluntary.

A spokesman for the ruling Zanu-PF party said Mr Mnangagwa, 71, would serve the remainder of Mr Mugabe’s term until elections that are due to be held by September 2018.

The state-run Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation (ZBC) confirmed that his swearing-in ceremony had been scheduled for Friday.

Nicknamed the “crocodile” because of his political cunning, Mr Mnangagwa issued a statement from exile calling on Zimbabweans to unite to rebuild the country.

“Together, we will ensure a peaceful transition to the consolidation of our democracy, and bring in a fresh start for all Zimbabweans and foster peace and unity,” Mr Mnangagwa told Zimbabwe’s NewsDay on Tuesday.

He met South African President Jacob Zuma before leaving for Zimbabwe.

Mr Mnangagwa’s firing by Robert Mugabe two weeks ago triggered an unprecedented political crisis in the country.
It had been seen by many as an attempt to clear the way for Grace Mugabe to succeed her husband as leader and riled the military leadership, which stepped in and put Mr Mugabe under house arrest.

Under the constitution, the role of successor would normally go to a serving vice-president, and one still remains in post – Phelekezela Mphoko.

However, Mr Mphoko – a key ally of Grace Mugabe – has just been fired by Zanu-PF and is not believed to be in the country. In his absence, the party has nominated Mr Mnangagwa, the speaker of parliament confirmed.

Source: BBC

  • Amos Agyemang

    Hi Bernard, I think your discussion on sanitation is all about how MMDA’S raise funds and manage them. This week my car was clamped for packing at a bus stop at Airport Police station by a LEDMA task force. They told me my charge was GHC150.00 cedis. I was ready to pay that money directly to the assembly but the receipt I was issued I am not sure it’s the assembly receipt, I’ve attached a copy.