Digital address system to cost $2.5m – Bawumia

The Vice President, Dr. Mahamudu Bawumia, has said Ghana’s digital addressing system which is expected to begin in two weeks time, will cost the country about $2.5 million.

He noted that the system, which will be one of the most advanced in the world when rolled out, currently has 16.1 billion unique addresses.

The addressing system, he said, is part of the institutional reforms by the government aimed at easing business registration and other accountability and management purposes.

“It is more advanced than the United States or the United Kingdom or Germany because they are stuck to old technology, and we are leapfrogging. We are going to a new technology; we are going to GPS-based technology”, Dr. Bawumia said.

The Vice President made the statement in a lecture dubbed ‘Developing Stronger Economies for the African Continent: the Missing Link’ at the 3rd Advancement Lecture Series 2017, organised by the Institutional Advancement Office of the University of Cape Coast on Wednesday.

He explained that, the new digital addressing system, has unique postcodes for every location in Ghana, saying, “We have been able to put together 16.1 billion addresses: every five by five metres square apart in Ghana has a unique address.”

“What is even more exciting about this new addressing system is that, it was actually designed by Ghanaians in Dansoman. Our men and women are amazing, and they beat the international competition because we were wondering if our people can deliver it”, he added.

The digital addressing system is among a range of technological reforms by the New Patriotic Party (NPP) government, aimed at ensuring efficiency on the delivery of services.

Other similar projects include the roll-out of the National ID card as well as the paperless system adopted at the country’s ports.

By: Joseph Ackon-Mensah/citifmonline.com/Ghana

  • Bob

    This is highly impressive. Technology holds many opportunities to create parity or jumpfrog developed nations in many ways. I’m glad an African country is looking at how to make things better through tech.

    From a South African.